Adam’s Blog

That’s my thing, keepin’ the faith, baby. –Joe Friday

Heal Our Land

Posted by Adam Graham on September 10, 2006

If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land.-2 Chronicles 7:14

This verse has been a favorite standby for years. Yet, it’s only recently that I’ve realized how much America needs it today. The thought of “healing our land” can often be viewed in terms of draughts, diseases, war, or economic suffering at home.

Our nation needs healing in a more profound way. In the course of our political debates, we’ve become two nations. One secular, humanistic, and hostile to religious faith outside the four walls of the Church. The other is theistic, or at least tolerant of a religious role in public life. One sees the greatest threat to our nation in the Bush Administration and the PATRIOT ACT, while the other sees the greatest threat in terrorists who seek to kill us.

My columns are most often advocating the view of the latter America. One thing haunts me in quiet moments. “A House divided against itself cannot stand.” Originally said by Christ and then quoted by Lincoln three years before the Civil War, the words echo in our political debates.

In years past, I’ve written of the need for common ground, but it hasn’t been forthcoming. Indeed, the gap between the two sides of the culture war swells by the day. And those who’ve stood as moderates are reaching the point when they must choose which side they’re on.

I’m not foolish enough to claim that in year’s past we all got along. Indeed, politics has been a contentious business, but never before in our nation’s history has the divide been so vast, so bitter, and so intractable.

Those who care about this divide often propose compromises, but when it comes to great cultural struggles, compromises are band aids that solve nothing, because the underlying problem still remains. A compromise over abortion or gay marriage would as little solve our cultural war as the Missouri Compromise and the Compromise of 1850 solved the issue of slavery.

Indeed, I would say there is no human effort that will long keep our nation safe from civil strife. From the harsh words posted on the Internet today, we will see even harsher deeds in years to come. We will fondly remember the days when physical assaults in politics were newsworthy. Dark clouds hover on the horizon, which have afflicted other lands. I see no aid in human wisdom, no hope in politicians who, election after election, promise to bring us together.

Five years ago, for a few days in the Autumn of 2001, we stood together, united by the most basic of instincts—survival and grief. Yet, it couldn’t last. We require far more to survive as a nation than short-term trauma or shared geography. We need to become a people once again.

But how does that happen? I see no way to resolve the differences. Certainly, there are ways to win the Culture War, but the bad thing about winning is you’re stuck living with the losers.

This has brought my mind back to 2. Chronicles 7:14. It is here we can find hope. Benjamin Franklin at the Constitutional Convention said, “I have lived, Sir, a long time and the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth — that God governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without his notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without his aid? We have been assured, Sir, in the sacred writings that “except the Lord build they labor in vain that build it.” I firmly believe this; and I also believe that without his concurring aid we shall succeed in this political building no better than the Builders of Babel:”

At this time in our country’s history, my greatest prayer has become that God would turn and heal our divided land and make us one nation once again.

Advertisements

7 Responses to “Heal Our Land”

  1. welder [Member] said

    Our nation needs healing in a more profound way. In the course of our political debates, we’ve become two nations. One secular, humanistic, and hostile to religious faith outside the four walls of the Church. The other is theistic, or at least tolerant of a religious role in public life. One sees the greatest threat to our nation in the Bush Administration and the PATRIOT ACT, while the other sees the greatest threat in terrorists who seek to kill us.

    Two things:

    1) It seems a little disingenuous to me to say that one side is “at least tolerant of a religious role in public life,” when so many of the people on that side are only tolerant of their religion, very narrowly defined as those who agree with them 100%, having a role in public life.

    2) I thought one of the ideals of being a red-blooded American was being willing to die for your freedom. Isn’t that where “you can have my gun when you pry it from my cold, dead hand,” comes from?

    Could you make a list for me of the liberties that are worth dying for and the ones that are not?

  2. Adam Graham [Member] said

    1) It’s not disengenuous at all. Your represenation of our side is.

    2) I’m not going to dignify your attempts to bring the venomous debates to this thread.

  3. welder [Member] said

    1) Having been told personally that I cannot be a Christian because of my liberal views, how do you think I should represent your side?

    2) I’m not trying to be venomous, snarky perhaps, but not venomous.

    But the truth is that I sincerely do not understand what seems to be the conservative viewpoint that it is noble and patriotic to be zealous in defense of the Second Amendment, but unAmerican to be equally zealous in defense of the Fourth.

  4. Adam Graham [Member] said

    1) I would say that whether one can be a good Christian and a good liberal, depends on your definition of both things, but that’s in the hands of God. I’d also that the idea of 100% agreement is somewhat silly as you never have that.

    2) I don’t understand why some people are ill-mannered enough to hijack threads for their own agendas.

  5. welder [Member] said

    I wasn’t promoting an agenda, I was responding to your implication that people who argue against the PATRIOT act are hurting America.

  6. Adam Graham [Member] said

    No, I said that disunity does hurt America. That’s the theme. One sentence mentioned the PATRIOT ACT.

  7. […] http://adamsweb.us/blog/htsrv/trackback.php/2310 […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: